14 Who was Cheddar Man? | #NHM_Live

#NHM_Live returned for a brand-new series on 18 April. Watch the recording of the live show here.

Meet Museum scientists who studied Cheddar Man and who use DNA to learn about our ancient relatives. Prof Chris Stringer and Dr Selina Brace were in the studio to answer your questions.

 

Delve deeper and explore the story of Cheddar Man here: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/cheddar-man.  

If you enjoyed this podcast please subscribe, rate and review in iTunes. We will be live every month. Join us on 16 May when we will be talking about dinosaurs.

Remarkable female scientists – Isabella Gordon, Crustacea specialist | Library and Archives

Dr Isabella Gordon (1901-1988), Crustacea specialist at the Natural History Museum 1928-1966.

A few weeks ago Catherine Booth made an appointment to view material in our reading room for the first time. Catherine has recently retired as Science Curator at the National Library of Scotland and will now able to spend time researching what had became an interest while she was working – the lives and careers of forgotten Scottish female scientists.  One of these scientists, Isabella Gordon, drew her to visit the Library and Archives at the Natural History Museum. The following is Catherine’s guest blog.

Continue reading “Remarkable female scientists – Isabella Gordon, Crustacea specialist | Library and Archives”

Today is a great day to explore nature! |Citizen Science

April 14 2018  is Citizen Science Day,  the start of a week celebrating all the amazing ways that people around the world contribute to science.

Citizen scientists are people like you and me, everyone from school children, to families, to dedicated volunteers, to local nature groups. Some go out into the wild to find and record nature, but you can even do science by joining projects at home.

Continue reading “Today is a great day to explore nature! |Citizen Science”

Wildlife Garden | Species review of the year 2017 – part 1: mostly moths, bees and wasps

Whilst Joe Beale and Wildlife Garden bird recorder Florin Feneru were focussing on birds, as reported in our previous blog, it was also a good time to take stock of other species we’ve seen. They may not be visible during the early part of the year, but were very much in evidence in the warmer months of 2017 and hopefully will soon reappear – in between the heavy rain showers and cold spells…

Continue reading “Wildlife Garden | Species review of the year 2017 – part 1: mostly moths, bees and wasps”

Darwin’s fossil mammals: discoveries that sparked the theory of evolution | Digital Collections Programme

1) book cover
Adrian Lister’s book, Darwin’s fossils: discoveries that shaped the theory of evolution

Guest blog by Adrian Lister

When I first joined the Museum as a fossil mammal researcher in 2007, I received a set of keys that gave me access to much of the museum’s huge collection.  Browsing one day, I opened an unremarkable cupboard and was startled to find six shelves of fossil bones with a sign reading ‘Charles Darwin, Beagle Voyage’.  Continue reading “Darwin’s fossil mammals: discoveries that sparked the theory of evolution | Digital Collections Programme”

Jammin’ at the Museum: The “DinoJam”

The Digital Media and Marketing department at the Natural History Museum has started a blog, and this is our first post! Our department is made up of four cross-discipline product teams, with each team consisting of product managers, designers, developers, content writers, data analysts and marketeers. Our blog posts will give an insight into our work and life at the Museum and we hope you’ll find them interesting and useful!

On the 22nd and 23rd March the Natural History Museum held its first ever Design Jam. Organised by the Digital Media and Marketing department, the event was called “Dino Jam” to provoke discussion and to demonstrate a break from routine work. It had two main objectives: 1) to think of new ideas for our Dino Directory website (which we’re in the process of redesigning, by the way – keep your eyes peeled) and 2) to bring together as many people from as many departments across the Museum as possible. It was a very enjoyable couple of days where we learned a lot and took away loads of ideas which we’re hoping to progress in due course. Continue reading “Jammin’ at the Museum: The “DinoJam””