Tag Archives: Minerals

The importance of being an unglamorous collection | Curator of Micropalaeontology

Most geological collections we hear about in the news are the prettiest, oldest, youngest, largest, smallest, rarest, most expensive or have some exciting story related to them that ties them to the evolution of our planet. Dinosaurs, human remains and meteorites are particularly popular. Over the last year we’ve embarked on a major curatorial project rehousing something that is the opposite – an unglamorous collection of bags of crushed rock.

Protective equipment

Curators Becky Smith, Helena Toman and Robin Hansen in protective equipment.

I’ll be explaining why the samples needed to be re-housed and most importantly why they are strategically important to the work of the Museum and needed to be kept for future reference. And also why we are all dressed up in protective equipment and why I had to learn to drive a fork lift truck! Continue reading

Wedding favours from the Museum | Shop at the Museum

With lengthening days, intermittent showers and the creeping return of greenery to the streets, there is one thing about this time of year that we can all rejoice in: the return of spring and summer. There is no denying that warmer weather, brighter days and leafy walks to work is enough to lift anyone’s spirits, and here at the Museum we have been putting together a collection of gifts in honor of one of the most significant happenings of the season. With the distant chiming of bells in mind we have put together a collection of gifts and small favours true to the natural beauty of a very momentous occasion – and no, it’s not our recent 135th birthday either.

Photo showing Life is sweet lollies with the Museum as a backdrop

Life is sweet with our raspberry lolly favours

Summer is of course the season of weddings, and what better way to celebrate this beautiful event than by some small reminders of the natural splendor of the earth, incorporated into the big day. But where did wedding favours come from? And why do we still use them? Surprisingly, this centuries old tradition has quite an extensive history of it’s own!

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New paper: Modal mineralogy of CI and CI-like chondrites by X-ray diffraction | Meteorites

Some meteorites, called CI chondrites, contain quite a lot of water; more than 15% of their total weight. Scientists have suggested that impacts by meteorites like these could have delivered water to the early Earth. The water in CI chondrites is locked up in minerals produced by aqueous alteration processes on the meteorite’s parent asteroid, billions of years ago. It has been very hard to study these minerals due to their small size, but new work carried out by the Meteorite Group at the Natural History Museum has been able to quantify the abundance of these minerals.

A CI chondrite being analysed by XRD. For analysis a small chip of a meteorite is powdered before being packed into a sample holder. In the image, the meteorite sample is the slightly grey region within the black sample holder. The X-rays come in from the tube at the right hand side.

A CI chondrite being analysed by XRD. For analysis a small chip of a meteorite is powdered before being packed into a sample holder. In the image, the meteorite sample is the slightly grey region within the black sample holder. The X-rays come in from the tube at the right hand side.

The minerals produced by aqueous alteration (including phyllosilicates, carbonates, sulphides and oxides) are typically less than one micron in size (the width of a human hair is around 100 microns!). They are very important, despite their small size, because they are major carriers of water in meteorites. We need to know how much of a meteorite is made of these minerals in order to fully understand fundamental things such as the physical and chemical conditions of aqueous alteration, and what the original starting mineralogy of asteroids was like.

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